Garden 2013: Update #1

Posted By on June 18, 2013

GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERAIt has almost been a month since we finished putting the last seeds and plants into our garden. I really can’t believe it myself. A whole month! No wonder it’s starting to boom. πŸ˜€

I personally have a hard time deciding what’s my favorite part of the garden, so here are a few highlights.

Raised Bed 1

Raised Bed 1

This is raised bed number one. It contains the beefsteak tomatoes, martin’s carrot peppers, head lettuce, sweet basil, collards, nasturtium, stuttgarter onion, and lemon drop marigolds. The tomatoes in this bed are looking absolutely great and we already have a few big ones set on. There are also some peppers on and the lettuce is flourishing.

Tomato in Raised Bed 1

Tomato in Raised Bed 1

Raised Bed 2

Raised Bed 2

The picture above is raised bed number two. In it are eggplant, nardello sweet pepper, california wonder bell pepper, peas, garden huckleberry, stuttgarter onion, and lemon drop marigolds. Out of this bed, the peas are looking the best! I am very happy with their progress and hope to have a few to eat and the rest to save as seed.

Raised Bed 3

Raised Bed 3

Raised bed number three is a bit different than the others. It contains mostly cucurbit family plants along with our coveted Rossa de Milano onions. This bed also has the arbor set into it for vines to grow up onto. The white you see is a floating row cover for our summer squash and zucchini. The reason we have it is to protect these plants from vine borers and cut worms. We’ve had issues with these plants being affected by these pests in the past and do not want to lose them this year. We made the cover with some fencing, frost protection fabric, and clothespins. In the future we hope to build something more permanent, but this will do fine for now.

Raised Bed 4

Raised Bed 4

Above is raised bed number four and our last raised bed made for the season. We have more cucurbit family plants in it, cauliflower, broccoli, beets, kohlrabi, and yellow of Parma onions. Neither of us have raised brassica family vegetables, so it’s been very fun to see them grow. It’s amazing how big they are getting!

Potatoes and Sunflowers

Potatoes and Sunflowers

Here we have our potato patch. Most of them were from last year’s crop that wintered over. We won’t do this again next year, but figured they’d be OK this year. We also threw in some eating potatoes that went started to grow and go bad in the cupboard. So, there’s several different varieties. It’s great to have diversity in the garden, especially with same type of plants. You may notice there’s another plant in this patch. Those are volunteer sunflowers from last year. I guess the birds didn’t get all the seeds eaten. πŸ˜‰ We almost think that the sunflowers are acting like a friendly companion planting that’s protecting our potato plants from flea beetles. We had a terrible infestation of them last year. However, the nematodes we sprayed last year might have taken care of the larvae as well and the more frequent rain could be keeping the plants healthier and stronger.

Corn, Pole Beans, and Sunflowers

Corn, Pole Beans, and Sunflowers

This is our last ‘patch’ area. It contains popcorn, pole beans, and new varieties of sunflowers. When the pole beans die they will fix nitrogen into the soil to aid the corn. We’ll see how it works timing wise. We may have to change our planting times in future years. We also hope to save some pure popcorn seed, so will be doing hand pollinating and covering when the time comes.

The rest of the garden is lined with garlic, ground cherries, a few winter squash, beans, gladiolas, spinach, turnips, onions, leeks, and tomatoes. We have so many tomato plants that we had to put some into our perennial fruit garden! 32 tomatoes in total … πŸ™‚ All I can say that it’s going to be an awesome canning season.

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–Annissa–

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